NC Pesticide Board announces recent case settlements – Neuse News

(Craven) Philip H. Kilmer, a licensed commercial pesticide applicator for the Emerald Golf Course in New Bern, agreed to pay $ 400 for the misuse of a pesticide at the baseball fields near Vanceboro. The pesticide is intended for agricultural use only.

(Craven) John C. Reed, owner and operator of Reed Landscape Irrigation, Inc. in New Bern, agreed to pay $ 800 because employees continued to apply pesticides after his pesticide applicator license expired. commercial.

(Harnett) Daniel P. Watkins, III, a private applicator of pesticides, agreed to pay $ 800 for using a pesticide in a manner inconsistent with its labeling, which had adverse effects on human health. migrant workers in a field east of Coats near Benson.

(Lenoir) Patrick Register, warehouse manager for Harvey’s Fertilizer and Gas in Kinston, agreed to pay $ 1,200 for the sale of restricted pesticides without a dealer license required and for the sale of a mislabelled product. Subsequently, another person became an authorized pesticide dealer for the company.

(Mecklenburg) David L. Scher, a licensed commercial pesticide applicator for King Green in Charlotte, agreed to pay $ 1,400 for violating regulations on use, storage, record keeping and disposal, including including the provision which states that “no one shall handle, transport, store, display or distribute pesticides in such a way as to endanger man and his environment or endanger food, feed or any other product that can be transported, stored, displayed or distributed with pesticides… ”

(Nash) Getsco, Inc., a bulk containment facility in Middlesex, agreed to pay $ 800 for failing to perform repairs and / or upgrades in order to bring the containment area into compliance with the law of the state. The company continued to sell and receive pesticides in bulk at the facility when it was not in compliance.

(New Hanover) Matthew T. Smith, a licensed public operator of pesticides, agreed to pay $ 800 for the application of a pesticide in a manner inconsistent with its labeling by allowing golfers to enter the greens of the course Wilmington Municipal Golf Course before there is sufficient time for the produce to dry.

(Onslow) Joseph Allen Floyd, owner and operator of Tidewater Landscaping in Hubert, agreed to pay $ 800 for commercial pesticide application without a license required. A state inspector discovered the violation in September 2019. Further examination showed that Floyd had not been granted a license after first receiving a notice of non-compliance in March 2016. Floyd still does. no license.

(Onslow) Blake Thornton, a licensed commercial pesticide applicator and owner of Turf Tech in Swansboro, agreed to pay $ 800 to make a restricted pesticide available to someone who is not a certified pesticide applicator .

o (Wayne) Regarding the above Onslow County case involving Blake Thornton, Michael C. Dreez agreed to pay $ 800 for the unlicensed restricted use pesticide application and use product in a manner inconsistent with its labeling by using it on a label-site in Goldsboro.

(Pitt) Michael R. Nichols, a commercial pesticide applicator for Trugreen in Greenville, agreed to pay $ 800 because he did not renew his pesticide applicator license and continued to apply pesticides. At the time of the investigation, no other Trugreen employee held a valid commercial pesticide applicator license. Nichols has since renewed his license.

(Robeson) Wilton Randy Britt, a private pesticide applicator near Orrum, agreed to pay $ 500 for using a pesticide in a manner inconsistent with its labeling by failing to document labeling requirements.

(Rutherford) Scott D. Hoyle, owner of Oakland Feed and Seed in Spindale, agreed to pay $ 1,400 for the sale of restricted pesticides without a pesticide dealer license required.

(Richmond, VA.) Regarding the above Rutherford County case, Southern States Cooperative in Richmond, Va., Agreed to pay $ 1,600 for the sale of restricted pesticides to a company in Spindale who did not have the proper certification to buy and sell the products.

(Sampson) Thomas S. Melvin, a private licensed pesticide applicator near Garland, agreed to pay $ 600 for the application of a soil fumigant without the additional certification required. It has since acquired the certification.

(Sampson) Michael K. Rivenbark, a licensed aerial pesticide applicator for Moore’s Aerial Applicators in Clinton, agreed to pay $ 1,200 to perform commercial pesticide applications without the proper category on his license.

(Surry) Walter Allen Worrell, a commercial pesticide applicator with an expired reciprocal license in Virginia agreed to pay $ 1,800 for pesticide application at Mt. Airy without a valid pesticide applicator license and pesticide application under conditions which derive from pesticide particles or vapors have had adverse effects on a tobacco crop.

(Wake) Richard A. Bialaszewski, a licensed commercial pesticide applicator for Skeeter B Gone in Holly Springs, agreed to pay $ 400 because an employee under Bialaszewski’s license supervision operated in a faulty, negligent or negligent manner by applying pesticide to the wrong residential address in Cary.

(Wake) Larry P. Blessing, a licensed pesticide applicator for Trugreen in Morrisville, agreed to pay $ 600 because an employee under his license supervision operated faulty, negligently or negligently while applying pesticide at the wrong residential address in Raleigh.

(Wake) Richard A. Cohen, a licensed pesticide applicator and owner of Mosquito Joe in Raleigh, agreed to pay $ 3,200 for improper rinse water disposal in a storm drain. Cohen told the inspector that on his instructions, an employee dumped the contents of a 100-gallon water container into a storm drain near the company. The sample taken from the drain showed traces of pesticides, indicating poor pesticide removal.

(Wayne) Richard W. Carter, a licensed commercial pesticide applicator for Spring Green Lawn Care in Goldsboro, agreed to pay $ 1,200 for the purchase and use of a restricted use pesticide that is only labeled for one. agricultural use.

o (Wayne) Regarding the Wayne County case above, Donnie J. Skelton, a licensed pesticide dealer at Patetown Dixie Fertilizer in Goldsboro, agreed to pay $ 700 for the sale of a pesticide product restricted use that is only labeled for agricultural use to a lawn care applicator.

(Yadkin) Jerome Mauldin, a private pesticide applicator, agreed to pay $ 600 for the purchase and application of restricted pesticides without a license required.

The following cases involved pesticide drift damage to non-target vegetation on neighboring properties. They are each listed with the name of the offender and the amount they have agreed to pay to settle each case. Each case violated the provisions of state law, including the provision that no one should apply pesticides under conditions such that drifting pesticide particles or vapors cause adverse effects. All other significant violations are also listed.

o (Bladen) William D. Brisson, a private pesticide applicator near Dublin, $ 500.

o (Columbus) Channing H. Foley, private pesticide applicator near Fair Bluff, $ 1,000.

o (Henderson) Adam Pryor, a private pesticide applicator near Hendersonville, $ 600.

o (Iredell) Joseph L. Binkley, a private pesticide applicator near Harmony, $ 600.

o (Northampton) Joe H. Martin, a private pesticide applicator near Conway, $ 600.

o (Onslow) David Jeff Collins, a private pesticide applicator near Maysville, $ 600.

o (Pitt) Woody Allen Ham, a private pesticide applicator near Ayden, $ 800. The violations also included non-compliance with the provision of the worker protection standard involving the use of a respirator specified by the product label.

o (Union) Kyle Herring, a private pesticide applicator near Monroe, $ 600.

o (Vance) N. Wayne Cleaton, a private pesticide applicator near Henderson, $ 1,200. The violations also included non-compliance with the provision of the worker protection standard involving the use of a respirator specified by the product label.

Source link